Halloween at Flower Shop Network 2012

Check out our last newsletter of 2012, pharm stomatology Merry & Bright! You’ll find great gift ideas for those oh-so-hard-to-buy-for people, decorating tips, and great trends for the New Year! Continue reading
Check out our last newsletter of 2012, stomatology Merry & Bright! You’ll find great gift ideas for those oh-so-hard-to-buy-for people, decorating tips, and great trends for the New Year! Continue reading

How do you keep your flowers fresh? We have all heard the folklore as well as my Grandma’s resolute instructions: a little bleach, viagra
a touch of vinegar, a splash of vodka. Add some sugar or 7-UP, aspirin, vitamin C, Listerine, and pennies, too. What works, what doesn’t, will it make a difference and will it harm my flowers?

Many home remedies have a thread of truth as their basis. Bleach, vinegar, vodka, hydrogen peroxide and Listerine are antibacterial agents. They work to keep the water clear and clean to allow the flowers to drink and rehydrate fully without clogging from bacteria. Sugar, 7-UP and Listerine have sugars that “feed” the flower as it drinks the water mixture. Lemon juice, vitamin C and aspirin are wetting agents (acidifiers). They lower the ph of the water so the flower will drink more rapidly.

What about the use of pennies? Now that is an interesting remedy. Copper is an antibacterial agent, and when pennies were made of real copper, they would release enough copper into the vase water to have an effect. But modern pennies, which are not made of copper, will have no effect other than making your vase of flowers a few cents more valuable.

While home remedies can work, they also can harm your flowers if applied improperly.

Thank goodness for professional flower food. No conjecture and no concerns. With proper treatment, many flowers can easily last a week or more. Even my Grandma would be impressed.

Flower foods include an antibacterial, a sugar and a wetting agent. All three together in the proper proportion and ready to mix with water. Follow the recipe on the container, and you can extend the life of your flowers by days. Some varieties react so favorably to proper flower food that they will live twice as long as they would with pure water.

With the use of professional flower food, roses will bloom more fully. Gerberas will stand tall without the dreaded “bent neck.” Carnations will last for weeks, and peonies will bloom full and lush.

One of my friends who is a flower care expert says it best: “Embrace the handling techniques grounded in scientific research and proven facts. The goal achieved — flowers that last.”

For more flower care advice, visit aboutflowers.com.

Check out our last newsletter of 2012, stomatology Merry & Bright! You’ll find great gift ideas for those oh-so-hard-to-buy-for people, decorating tips, and great trends for the New Year! Continue reading

How do you keep your flowers fresh? We have all heard the folklore as well as my Grandma’s resolute instructions: a little bleach, viagra
a touch of vinegar, a splash of vodka. Add some sugar or 7-UP, aspirin, vitamin C, Listerine, and pennies, too. What works, what doesn’t, will it make a difference and will it harm my flowers?

Many home remedies have a thread of truth as their basis. Bleach, vinegar, vodka, hydrogen peroxide and Listerine are antibacterial agents. They work to keep the water clear and clean to allow the flowers to drink and rehydrate fully without clogging from bacteria. Sugar, 7-UP and Listerine have sugars that “feed” the flower as it drinks the water mixture. Lemon juice, vitamin C and aspirin are wetting agents (acidifiers). They lower the ph of the water so the flower will drink more rapidly.

What about the use of pennies? Now that is an interesting remedy. Copper is an antibacterial agent, and when pennies were made of real copper, they would release enough copper into the vase water to have an effect. But modern pennies, which are not made of copper, will have no effect other than making your vase of flowers a few cents more valuable.

While home remedies can work, they also can harm your flowers if applied improperly.

Thank goodness for professional flower food. No conjecture and no concerns. With proper treatment, many flowers can easily last a week or more. Even my Grandma would be impressed.

Flower foods include an antibacterial, a sugar and a wetting agent. All three together in the proper proportion and ready to mix with water. Follow the recipe on the container, and you can extend the life of your flowers by days. Some varieties react so favorably to proper flower food that they will live twice as long as they would with pure water.

With the use of professional flower food, roses will bloom more fully. Gerberas will stand tall without the dreaded “bent neck.” Carnations will last for weeks, and peonies will bloom full and lush.

One of my friends who is a flower care expert says it best: “Embrace the handling techniques grounded in scientific research and proven facts. The goal achieved — flowers that last.”

For more flower care advice, visit aboutflowers.com.

Superstorm Sandy has pummeled much of the east coast and many businesses, allergist
including florists, have been effected. We will do our best to make contact with all of our florists in Sandy’s wake, although with power outages and flooding, it … Continue reading
Check out our last newsletter of 2012, stomatology Merry & Bright! You’ll find great gift ideas for those oh-so-hard-to-buy-for people, decorating tips, and great trends for the New Year! Continue reading

How do you keep your flowers fresh? We have all heard the folklore as well as my Grandma’s resolute instructions: a little bleach, viagra
a touch of vinegar, a splash of vodka. Add some sugar or 7-UP, aspirin, vitamin C, Listerine, and pennies, too. What works, what doesn’t, will it make a difference and will it harm my flowers?

Many home remedies have a thread of truth as their basis. Bleach, vinegar, vodka, hydrogen peroxide and Listerine are antibacterial agents. They work to keep the water clear and clean to allow the flowers to drink and rehydrate fully without clogging from bacteria. Sugar, 7-UP and Listerine have sugars that “feed” the flower as it drinks the water mixture. Lemon juice, vitamin C and aspirin are wetting agents (acidifiers). They lower the ph of the water so the flower will drink more rapidly.

What about the use of pennies? Now that is an interesting remedy. Copper is an antibacterial agent, and when pennies were made of real copper, they would release enough copper into the vase water to have an effect. But modern pennies, which are not made of copper, will have no effect other than making your vase of flowers a few cents more valuable.

While home remedies can work, they also can harm your flowers if applied improperly.

Thank goodness for professional flower food. No conjecture and no concerns. With proper treatment, many flowers can easily last a week or more. Even my Grandma would be impressed.

Flower foods include an antibacterial, a sugar and a wetting agent. All three together in the proper proportion and ready to mix with water. Follow the recipe on the container, and you can extend the life of your flowers by days. Some varieties react so favorably to proper flower food that they will live twice as long as they would with pure water.

With the use of professional flower food, roses will bloom more fully. Gerberas will stand tall without the dreaded “bent neck.” Carnations will last for weeks, and peonies will bloom full and lush.

One of my friends who is a flower care expert says it best: “Embrace the handling techniques grounded in scientific research and proven facts. The goal achieved — flowers that last.”

For more flower care advice, visit aboutflowers.com.

Superstorm Sandy has pummeled much of the east coast and many businesses, allergist
including florists, have been effected. We will do our best to make contact with all of our florists in Sandy’s wake, although with power outages and flooding, it … Continue reading
As the holidays approach, mind it’s almost time for our final VaseOff! Challenge for 2012, sick
the third in a series of floral design challenges that showcase the true talent and artistry of florists and give you a chance to vote for your favorite floral designs. In April we challenged our designers to create a 1920s Great […] Check out our last newsletter of 2012, stomatology Merry & Bright! You’ll find great gift ideas for those oh-so-hard-to-buy-for people, decorating tips, and great trends for the New Year! Continue reading

How do you keep your flowers fresh? We have all heard the folklore as well as my Grandma’s resolute instructions: a little bleach, viagra
a touch of vinegar, a splash of vodka. Add some sugar or 7-UP, aspirin, vitamin C, Listerine, and pennies, too. What works, what doesn’t, will it make a difference and will it harm my flowers?

Many home remedies have a thread of truth as their basis. Bleach, vinegar, vodka, hydrogen peroxide and Listerine are antibacterial agents. They work to keep the water clear and clean to allow the flowers to drink and rehydrate fully without clogging from bacteria. Sugar, 7-UP and Listerine have sugars that “feed” the flower as it drinks the water mixture. Lemon juice, vitamin C and aspirin are wetting agents (acidifiers). They lower the ph of the water so the flower will drink more rapidly.

What about the use of pennies? Now that is an interesting remedy. Copper is an antibacterial agent, and when pennies were made of real copper, they would release enough copper into the vase water to have an effect. But modern pennies, which are not made of copper, will have no effect other than making your vase of flowers a few cents more valuable.

While home remedies can work, they also can harm your flowers if applied improperly.

Thank goodness for professional flower food. No conjecture and no concerns. With proper treatment, many flowers can easily last a week or more. Even my Grandma would be impressed.

Flower foods include an antibacterial, a sugar and a wetting agent. All three together in the proper proportion and ready to mix with water. Follow the recipe on the container, and you can extend the life of your flowers by days. Some varieties react so favorably to proper flower food that they will live twice as long as they would with pure water.

With the use of professional flower food, roses will bloom more fully. Gerberas will stand tall without the dreaded “bent neck.” Carnations will last for weeks, and peonies will bloom full and lush.

One of my friends who is a flower care expert says it best: “Embrace the handling techniques grounded in scientific research and proven facts. The goal achieved — flowers that last.”

For more flower care advice, visit aboutflowers.com.

Superstorm Sandy has pummeled much of the east coast and many businesses, allergist
including florists, have been effected. We will do our best to make contact with all of our florists in Sandy’s wake, although with power outages and flooding, it … Continue reading
As the holidays approach, mind it’s almost time for our final VaseOff! Challenge for 2012, sick
the third in a series of floral design challenges that showcase the true talent and artistry of florists and give you a chance to vote for your favorite floral designs. In April we challenged our designers to create a 1920s Great […] As the holidays approach, tadalafil
it’s almost time for our final VaseOff! Challenge for 2012, vitamin
the third in a series of floral design challenges that showcase the true talent and artistry of florists and give you a chance to vote for your favorite floral designs. In April we challenged our designers to create a 1920s Great […] Check out our last newsletter of 2012, stomatology Merry & Bright! You’ll find great gift ideas for those oh-so-hard-to-buy-for people, decorating tips, and great trends for the New Year! Continue reading

How do you keep your flowers fresh? We have all heard the folklore as well as my Grandma’s resolute instructions: a little bleach, viagra
a touch of vinegar, a splash of vodka. Add some sugar or 7-UP, aspirin, vitamin C, Listerine, and pennies, too. What works, what doesn’t, will it make a difference and will it harm my flowers?

Many home remedies have a thread of truth as their basis. Bleach, vinegar, vodka, hydrogen peroxide and Listerine are antibacterial agents. They work to keep the water clear and clean to allow the flowers to drink and rehydrate fully without clogging from bacteria. Sugar, 7-UP and Listerine have sugars that “feed” the flower as it drinks the water mixture. Lemon juice, vitamin C and aspirin are wetting agents (acidifiers). They lower the ph of the water so the flower will drink more rapidly.

What about the use of pennies? Now that is an interesting remedy. Copper is an antibacterial agent, and when pennies were made of real copper, they would release enough copper into the vase water to have an effect. But modern pennies, which are not made of copper, will have no effect other than making your vase of flowers a few cents more valuable.

While home remedies can work, they also can harm your flowers if applied improperly.

Thank goodness for professional flower food. No conjecture and no concerns. With proper treatment, many flowers can easily last a week or more. Even my Grandma would be impressed.

Flower foods include an antibacterial, a sugar and a wetting agent. All three together in the proper proportion and ready to mix with water. Follow the recipe on the container, and you can extend the life of your flowers by days. Some varieties react so favorably to proper flower food that they will live twice as long as they would with pure water.

With the use of professional flower food, roses will bloom more fully. Gerberas will stand tall without the dreaded “bent neck.” Carnations will last for weeks, and peonies will bloom full and lush.

One of my friends who is a flower care expert says it best: “Embrace the handling techniques grounded in scientific research and proven facts. The goal achieved — flowers that last.”

For more flower care advice, visit aboutflowers.com.

Superstorm Sandy has pummeled much of the east coast and many businesses, allergist
including florists, have been effected. We will do our best to make contact with all of our florists in Sandy’s wake, although with power outages and flooding, it … Continue reading
As the holidays approach, mind it’s almost time for our final VaseOff! Challenge for 2012, sick
the third in a series of floral design challenges that showcase the true talent and artistry of florists and give you a chance to vote for your favorite floral designs. In April we challenged our designers to create a 1920s Great […] As the holidays approach, tadalafil
it’s almost time for our final VaseOff! Challenge for 2012, vitamin
the third in a series of floral design challenges that showcase the true talent and artistry of florists and give you a chance to vote for your favorite floral designs. In April we challenged our designers to create a 1920s Great […]

My mother collected turtle figurines. She had hundreds of them. For her service, check
I placed figurines that she loved from the grandchildren in and around her casket spray and in other floral tributes. Everyone was delighted with the hunt for turtles.

Many years ago, my friend’s father, an avid ice fisherman, died. My friend asked me to make the casket spray for the service, as I knew her father well. He loved fishing, and we collected ice fishing poles, a small bait bucket, an ice hole scooper and fishing hats — one said, “I fish with Grandpa” — to display in the floral tribute. We placed the hats in the center of the design with the fishing equipment sprinkled around. The design included cattails, branches, twigs and moss. Flowers in front hung down with small branches and greens to resemble under the water. We tied small fish onto the ice fishing poles with monofilament line. It was designed for Grandpa.

The tribute drew an overwhelming response from guests at the service. Everyone wanted to know who created it. So many were asking me questions about the design, I was embarrassed to be the center of attention instead of Grandpa. I went outside and debated internally if I should leave.

My friend came out to find me, and I told her my concerns. She said in a nice way, “What makes you think this is about you?”

I asked her what she meant.

She lovingly said, “The tribute is a vehicle to help people communicate.”

I had never thought of it that way. People who didn’t know each other were talking to each other because of the tribute. They were swapping stories. One guest may say, “Did you fish with Grandpa?” The other, “Yes, we were neighbors raising our kids.” The tribute fostered communication and connections.

My mother collected turtle figurines. She had hundreds of them. For her service, I placed figurines that she loved from the grandchildren in and around her casket spray and in other floral tributes. Everyone was delighted with the hunt for turtles.

Flowers provide warmth and bring people together, especially at those times when it is difficult to come up with the right words.

Talk to your local florist. Tell them stories about your loved one. Tell them about your loved one’s hobbies, so your florist can create a truly special tribute. The sharing also will help you process your grief. Your florist will know the questions to ask, give you time to think and process your emotions and come together with the perfect tribute.

Check out our last newsletter of 2012, stomatology Merry & Bright! You’ll find great gift ideas for those oh-so-hard-to-buy-for people, decorating tips, and great trends for the New Year! Continue reading

How do you keep your flowers fresh? We have all heard the folklore as well as my Grandma’s resolute instructions: a little bleach, viagra
a touch of vinegar, a splash of vodka. Add some sugar or 7-UP, aspirin, vitamin C, Listerine, and pennies, too. What works, what doesn’t, will it make a difference and will it harm my flowers?

Many home remedies have a thread of truth as their basis. Bleach, vinegar, vodka, hydrogen peroxide and Listerine are antibacterial agents. They work to keep the water clear and clean to allow the flowers to drink and rehydrate fully without clogging from bacteria. Sugar, 7-UP and Listerine have sugars that “feed” the flower as it drinks the water mixture. Lemon juice, vitamin C and aspirin are wetting agents (acidifiers). They lower the ph of the water so the flower will drink more rapidly.

What about the use of pennies? Now that is an interesting remedy. Copper is an antibacterial agent, and when pennies were made of real copper, they would release enough copper into the vase water to have an effect. But modern pennies, which are not made of copper, will have no effect other than making your vase of flowers a few cents more valuable.

While home remedies can work, they also can harm your flowers if applied improperly.

Thank goodness for professional flower food. No conjecture and no concerns. With proper treatment, many flowers can easily last a week or more. Even my Grandma would be impressed.

Flower foods include an antibacterial, a sugar and a wetting agent. All three together in the proper proportion and ready to mix with water. Follow the recipe on the container, and you can extend the life of your flowers by days. Some varieties react so favorably to proper flower food that they will live twice as long as they would with pure water.

With the use of professional flower food, roses will bloom more fully. Gerberas will stand tall without the dreaded “bent neck.” Carnations will last for weeks, and peonies will bloom full and lush.

One of my friends who is a flower care expert says it best: “Embrace the handling techniques grounded in scientific research and proven facts. The goal achieved — flowers that last.”

For more flower care advice, visit aboutflowers.com.

Superstorm Sandy has pummeled much of the east coast and many businesses, allergist
including florists, have been effected. We will do our best to make contact with all of our florists in Sandy’s wake, although with power outages and flooding, it … Continue reading
As the holidays approach, mind it’s almost time for our final VaseOff! Challenge for 2012, sick
the third in a series of floral design challenges that showcase the true talent and artistry of florists and give you a chance to vote for your favorite floral designs. In April we challenged our designers to create a 1920s Great […] As the holidays approach, tadalafil
it’s almost time for our final VaseOff! Challenge for 2012, vitamin
the third in a series of floral design challenges that showcase the true talent and artistry of florists and give you a chance to vote for your favorite floral designs. In April we challenged our designers to create a 1920s Great […]

My mother collected turtle figurines. She had hundreds of them. For her service, check
I placed figurines that she loved from the grandchildren in and around her casket spray and in other floral tributes. Everyone was delighted with the hunt for turtles.

Many years ago, my friend’s father, an avid ice fisherman, died. My friend asked me to make the casket spray for the service, as I knew her father well. He loved fishing, and we collected ice fishing poles, a small bait bucket, an ice hole scooper and fishing hats — one said, “I fish with Grandpa” — to display in the floral tribute. We placed the hats in the center of the design with the fishing equipment sprinkled around. The design included cattails, branches, twigs and moss. Flowers in front hung down with small branches and greens to resemble under the water. We tied small fish onto the ice fishing poles with monofilament line. It was designed for Grandpa.

The tribute drew an overwhelming response from guests at the service. Everyone wanted to know who created it. So many were asking me questions about the design, I was embarrassed to be the center of attention instead of Grandpa. I went outside and debated internally if I should leave.

My friend came out to find me, and I told her my concerns. She said in a nice way, “What makes you think this is about you?”

I asked her what she meant.

She lovingly said, “The tribute is a vehicle to help people communicate.”

I had never thought of it that way. People who didn’t know each other were talking to each other because of the tribute. They were swapping stories. One guest may say, “Did you fish with Grandpa?” The other, “Yes, we were neighbors raising our kids.” The tribute fostered communication and connections.

My mother collected turtle figurines. She had hundreds of them. For her service, I placed figurines that she loved from the grandchildren in and around her casket spray and in other floral tributes. Everyone was delighted with the hunt for turtles.

Flowers provide warmth and bring people together, especially at those times when it is difficult to come up with the right words.

Talk to your local florist. Tell them stories about your loved one. Tell them about your loved one’s hobbies, so your florist can create a truly special tribute. The sharing also will help you process your grief. Your florist will know the questions to ask, give you time to think and process your emotions and come together with the perfect tribute.

How do you keep your flowers fresh? We have all heard the folklore as well as my Grandma’s resolute instructions: a little bleach, weight loss
a touch of vinegar, a splash of vodka. Add some sugar or 7-UP, aspirin, vitamin C, Listerine, and pennies, too. What works, what doesn’t, will it make a difference and will it harm my flowers?

Many home remedies have a thread of truth as their basis. Bleach, vinegar, vodka, hydrogen peroxide and Listerine are antibacterial agents. They work to keep the water clear and clean to allow the flowers to drink and rehydrate fully without clogging from bacteria. Sugar, 7-UP and Listerine have sugars that “feed” the flower as it drinks the water mixture. Lemon juice, vitamin C and aspirin are wetting agents (acidifiers). They lower the ph of the water so the flower will drink more rapidly.

What about the use of pennies? Now that is an interesting remedy. Copper is an antibacterial agent, and when pennies were made of real copper, they would release enough copper into the vase water to have an effect. But modern pennies, which are not made of copper, will have no effect other than making your vase of flowers a few cents more valuable.

While home remedies can work, they also can harm your flowers if applied improperly.

Thank goodness for professional flower food. No conjecture and no concerns. With proper treatment, many flowers can easily last a week or more. Even my Grandma would be impressed.

Flower foods include an antibacterial, a sugar and a wetting agent. All three together in the proper proportion and ready to mix with water. Follow the recipe on the container, and you can extend the life of your flowers by days. Some varieties react so favorably to proper flower food that they will live twice as long as they would with pure water.

With the use of professional flower food, roses will bloom more fully. Gerberas will stand tall without the dreaded “bent neck.” Carnations will last for weeks, and peonies will bloom full and lush.

One of my friends who is a flower care expert says it best: “Embrace the handling techniques grounded in scientific research and proven facts. The goal achieved — flowers that last.”

For more flower care advice, visit aboutflowers.com.

Check out our last newsletter of 2012, stomatology Merry & Bright! You’ll find great gift ideas for those oh-so-hard-to-buy-for people, decorating tips, and great trends for the New Year! Continue reading

How do you keep your flowers fresh? We have all heard the folklore as well as my Grandma’s resolute instructions: a little bleach, viagra
a touch of vinegar, a splash of vodka. Add some sugar or 7-UP, aspirin, vitamin C, Listerine, and pennies, too. What works, what doesn’t, will it make a difference and will it harm my flowers?

Many home remedies have a thread of truth as their basis. Bleach, vinegar, vodka, hydrogen peroxide and Listerine are antibacterial agents. They work to keep the water clear and clean to allow the flowers to drink and rehydrate fully without clogging from bacteria. Sugar, 7-UP and Listerine have sugars that “feed” the flower as it drinks the water mixture. Lemon juice, vitamin C and aspirin are wetting agents (acidifiers). They lower the ph of the water so the flower will drink more rapidly.

What about the use of pennies? Now that is an interesting remedy. Copper is an antibacterial agent, and when pennies were made of real copper, they would release enough copper into the vase water to have an effect. But modern pennies, which are not made of copper, will have no effect other than making your vase of flowers a few cents more valuable.

While home remedies can work, they also can harm your flowers if applied improperly.

Thank goodness for professional flower food. No conjecture and no concerns. With proper treatment, many flowers can easily last a week or more. Even my Grandma would be impressed.

Flower foods include an antibacterial, a sugar and a wetting agent. All three together in the proper proportion and ready to mix with water. Follow the recipe on the container, and you can extend the life of your flowers by days. Some varieties react so favorably to proper flower food that they will live twice as long as they would with pure water.

With the use of professional flower food, roses will bloom more fully. Gerberas will stand tall without the dreaded “bent neck.” Carnations will last for weeks, and peonies will bloom full and lush.

One of my friends who is a flower care expert says it best: “Embrace the handling techniques grounded in scientific research and proven facts. The goal achieved — flowers that last.”

For more flower care advice, visit aboutflowers.com.

Superstorm Sandy has pummeled much of the east coast and many businesses, allergist
including florists, have been effected. We will do our best to make contact with all of our florists in Sandy’s wake, although with power outages and flooding, it … Continue reading
As the holidays approach, mind it’s almost time for our final VaseOff! Challenge for 2012, sick
the third in a series of floral design challenges that showcase the true talent and artistry of florists and give you a chance to vote for your favorite floral designs. In April we challenged our designers to create a 1920s Great […] As the holidays approach, tadalafil
it’s almost time for our final VaseOff! Challenge for 2012, vitamin
the third in a series of floral design challenges that showcase the true talent and artistry of florists and give you a chance to vote for your favorite floral designs. In April we challenged our designers to create a 1920s Great […]

My mother collected turtle figurines. She had hundreds of them. For her service, check
I placed figurines that she loved from the grandchildren in and around her casket spray and in other floral tributes. Everyone was delighted with the hunt for turtles.

Many years ago, my friend’s father, an avid ice fisherman, died. My friend asked me to make the casket spray for the service, as I knew her father well. He loved fishing, and we collected ice fishing poles, a small bait bucket, an ice hole scooper and fishing hats — one said, “I fish with Grandpa” — to display in the floral tribute. We placed the hats in the center of the design with the fishing equipment sprinkled around. The design included cattails, branches, twigs and moss. Flowers in front hung down with small branches and greens to resemble under the water. We tied small fish onto the ice fishing poles with monofilament line. It was designed for Grandpa.

The tribute drew an overwhelming response from guests at the service. Everyone wanted to know who created it. So many were asking me questions about the design, I was embarrassed to be the center of attention instead of Grandpa. I went outside and debated internally if I should leave.

My friend came out to find me, and I told her my concerns. She said in a nice way, “What makes you think this is about you?”

I asked her what she meant.

She lovingly said, “The tribute is a vehicle to help people communicate.”

I had never thought of it that way. People who didn’t know each other were talking to each other because of the tribute. They were swapping stories. One guest may say, “Did you fish with Grandpa?” The other, “Yes, we were neighbors raising our kids.” The tribute fostered communication and connections.

My mother collected turtle figurines. She had hundreds of them. For her service, I placed figurines that she loved from the grandchildren in and around her casket spray and in other floral tributes. Everyone was delighted with the hunt for turtles.

Flowers provide warmth and bring people together, especially at those times when it is difficult to come up with the right words.

Talk to your local florist. Tell them stories about your loved one. Tell them about your loved one’s hobbies, so your florist can create a truly special tribute. The sharing also will help you process your grief. Your florist will know the questions to ask, give you time to think and process your emotions and come together with the perfect tribute.

How do you keep your flowers fresh? We have all heard the folklore as well as my Grandma’s resolute instructions: a little bleach, weight loss
a touch of vinegar, a splash of vodka. Add some sugar or 7-UP, aspirin, vitamin C, Listerine, and pennies, too. What works, what doesn’t, will it make a difference and will it harm my flowers?

Many home remedies have a thread of truth as their basis. Bleach, vinegar, vodka, hydrogen peroxide and Listerine are antibacterial agents. They work to keep the water clear and clean to allow the flowers to drink and rehydrate fully without clogging from bacteria. Sugar, 7-UP and Listerine have sugars that “feed” the flower as it drinks the water mixture. Lemon juice, vitamin C and aspirin are wetting agents (acidifiers). They lower the ph of the water so the flower will drink more rapidly.

What about the use of pennies? Now that is an interesting remedy. Copper is an antibacterial agent, and when pennies were made of real copper, they would release enough copper into the vase water to have an effect. But modern pennies, which are not made of copper, will have no effect other than making your vase of flowers a few cents more valuable.

While home remedies can work, they also can harm your flowers if applied improperly.

Thank goodness for professional flower food. No conjecture and no concerns. With proper treatment, many flowers can easily last a week or more. Even my Grandma would be impressed.

Flower foods include an antibacterial, a sugar and a wetting agent. All three together in the proper proportion and ready to mix with water. Follow the recipe on the container, and you can extend the life of your flowers by days. Some varieties react so favorably to proper flower food that they will live twice as long as they would with pure water.

With the use of professional flower food, roses will bloom more fully. Gerberas will stand tall without the dreaded “bent neck.” Carnations will last for weeks, and peonies will bloom full and lush.

One of my friends who is a flower care expert says it best: “Embrace the handling techniques grounded in scientific research and proven facts. The goal achieved — flowers that last.”

For more flower care advice, visit aboutflowers.com.

How do you keep your flowers fresh? We have all heard the folklore as well as my Grandma’s resolute instructions: a little bleach, gynecologist
see a touch of vinegar, a splash of vodka. Add some sugar or 7-UP, aspirin, vitamin C, Listerine, and pennies, too. What works, what doesn’t, will it make a difference and will it harm my flowers?

Many home remedies have a thread of truth as their basis. Bleach, vinegar, vodka, hydrogen peroxide and Listerine are antibacterial agents. They work to keep the water clear and clean to allow the flowers to drink and rehydrate fully without clogging from bacteria. Sugar, 7-UP and Listerine have sugars that “feed” the flower as it drinks the water mixture. Lemon juice, vitamin C and aspirin are wetting agents (acidifiers). They lower the ph of the water so the flower will drink more rapidly.

What about the use of pennies? Now that is an interesting remedy. Copper is an antibacterial agent, and when pennies were made of real copper, they would release enough copper into the vase water to have an effect. But modern pennies, which are not made of copper, will have no effect other than making your vase of flowers a few cents more valuable.

While home remedies can work, they also can harm your flowers if applied improperly.

Thank goodness for professional flower food. No conjecture and no concerns. With proper treatment, many flowers can easily last a week or more. Even my Grandma would be impressed.

Flower foods include an antibacterial, a sugar and a wetting agent. All three together in the proper proportion and ready to mix with water. Follow the recipe on the container, and you can extend the life of your flowers by days. Some varieties react so favorably to proper flower food that they will live twice as long as they would with pure water.

With the use of professional flower food, roses will bloom more fully. Gerberas will stand tall without the dreaded “bent neck.” Carnations will last for weeks, and peonies will bloom full and lush.

One of my friends who is a flower care expert says it best: “Embrace the handling techniques grounded in scientific research and proven facts. The goal achieved — flowers that last.”

For more flower care advice, visit aboutflowers.com.

Check out our last newsletter of 2012, stomatology Merry & Bright! You’ll find great gift ideas for those oh-so-hard-to-buy-for people, decorating tips, and great trends for the New Year! Continue reading

How do you keep your flowers fresh? We have all heard the folklore as well as my Grandma’s resolute instructions: a little bleach, viagra
a touch of vinegar, a splash of vodka. Add some sugar or 7-UP, aspirin, vitamin C, Listerine, and pennies, too. What works, what doesn’t, will it make a difference and will it harm my flowers?

Many home remedies have a thread of truth as their basis. Bleach, vinegar, vodka, hydrogen peroxide and Listerine are antibacterial agents. They work to keep the water clear and clean to allow the flowers to drink and rehydrate fully without clogging from bacteria. Sugar, 7-UP and Listerine have sugars that “feed” the flower as it drinks the water mixture. Lemon juice, vitamin C and aspirin are wetting agents (acidifiers). They lower the ph of the water so the flower will drink more rapidly.

What about the use of pennies? Now that is an interesting remedy. Copper is an antibacterial agent, and when pennies were made of real copper, they would release enough copper into the vase water to have an effect. But modern pennies, which are not made of copper, will have no effect other than making your vase of flowers a few cents more valuable.

While home remedies can work, they also can harm your flowers if applied improperly.

Thank goodness for professional flower food. No conjecture and no concerns. With proper treatment, many flowers can easily last a week or more. Even my Grandma would be impressed.

Flower foods include an antibacterial, a sugar and a wetting agent. All three together in the proper proportion and ready to mix with water. Follow the recipe on the container, and you can extend the life of your flowers by days. Some varieties react so favorably to proper flower food that they will live twice as long as they would with pure water.

With the use of professional flower food, roses will bloom more fully. Gerberas will stand tall without the dreaded “bent neck.” Carnations will last for weeks, and peonies will bloom full and lush.

One of my friends who is a flower care expert says it best: “Embrace the handling techniques grounded in scientific research and proven facts. The goal achieved — flowers that last.”

For more flower care advice, visit aboutflowers.com.

Superstorm Sandy has pummeled much of the east coast and many businesses, allergist
including florists, have been effected. We will do our best to make contact with all of our florists in Sandy’s wake, although with power outages and flooding, it … Continue reading
As the holidays approach, mind it’s almost time for our final VaseOff! Challenge for 2012, sick
the third in a series of floral design challenges that showcase the true talent and artistry of florists and give you a chance to vote for your favorite floral designs. In April we challenged our designers to create a 1920s Great […] As the holidays approach, tadalafil
it’s almost time for our final VaseOff! Challenge for 2012, vitamin
the third in a series of floral design challenges that showcase the true talent and artistry of florists and give you a chance to vote for your favorite floral designs. In April we challenged our designers to create a 1920s Great […]

My mother collected turtle figurines. She had hundreds of them. For her service, check
I placed figurines that she loved from the grandchildren in and around her casket spray and in other floral tributes. Everyone was delighted with the hunt for turtles.

Many years ago, my friend’s father, an avid ice fisherman, died. My friend asked me to make the casket spray for the service, as I knew her father well. He loved fishing, and we collected ice fishing poles, a small bait bucket, an ice hole scooper and fishing hats — one said, “I fish with Grandpa” — to display in the floral tribute. We placed the hats in the center of the design with the fishing equipment sprinkled around. The design included cattails, branches, twigs and moss. Flowers in front hung down with small branches and greens to resemble under the water. We tied small fish onto the ice fishing poles with monofilament line. It was designed for Grandpa.

The tribute drew an overwhelming response from guests at the service. Everyone wanted to know who created it. So many were asking me questions about the design, I was embarrassed to be the center of attention instead of Grandpa. I went outside and debated internally if I should leave.

My friend came out to find me, and I told her my concerns. She said in a nice way, “What makes you think this is about you?”

I asked her what she meant.

She lovingly said, “The tribute is a vehicle to help people communicate.”

I had never thought of it that way. People who didn’t know each other were talking to each other because of the tribute. They were swapping stories. One guest may say, “Did you fish with Grandpa?” The other, “Yes, we were neighbors raising our kids.” The tribute fostered communication and connections.

My mother collected turtle figurines. She had hundreds of them. For her service, I placed figurines that she loved from the grandchildren in and around her casket spray and in other floral tributes. Everyone was delighted with the hunt for turtles.

Flowers provide warmth and bring people together, especially at those times when it is difficult to come up with the right words.

Talk to your local florist. Tell them stories about your loved one. Tell them about your loved one’s hobbies, so your florist can create a truly special tribute. The sharing also will help you process your grief. Your florist will know the questions to ask, give you time to think and process your emotions and come together with the perfect tribute.

How do you keep your flowers fresh? We have all heard the folklore as well as my Grandma’s resolute instructions: a little bleach, weight loss
a touch of vinegar, a splash of vodka. Add some sugar or 7-UP, aspirin, vitamin C, Listerine, and pennies, too. What works, what doesn’t, will it make a difference and will it harm my flowers?

Many home remedies have a thread of truth as their basis. Bleach, vinegar, vodka, hydrogen peroxide and Listerine are antibacterial agents. They work to keep the water clear and clean to allow the flowers to drink and rehydrate fully without clogging from bacteria. Sugar, 7-UP and Listerine have sugars that “feed” the flower as it drinks the water mixture. Lemon juice, vitamin C and aspirin are wetting agents (acidifiers). They lower the ph of the water so the flower will drink more rapidly.

What about the use of pennies? Now that is an interesting remedy. Copper is an antibacterial agent, and when pennies were made of real copper, they would release enough copper into the vase water to have an effect. But modern pennies, which are not made of copper, will have no effect other than making your vase of flowers a few cents more valuable.

While home remedies can work, they also can harm your flowers if applied improperly.

Thank goodness for professional flower food. No conjecture and no concerns. With proper treatment, many flowers can easily last a week or more. Even my Grandma would be impressed.

Flower foods include an antibacterial, a sugar and a wetting agent. All three together in the proper proportion and ready to mix with water. Follow the recipe on the container, and you can extend the life of your flowers by days. Some varieties react so favorably to proper flower food that they will live twice as long as they would with pure water.

With the use of professional flower food, roses will bloom more fully. Gerberas will stand tall without the dreaded “bent neck.” Carnations will last for weeks, and peonies will bloom full and lush.

One of my friends who is a flower care expert says it best: “Embrace the handling techniques grounded in scientific research and proven facts. The goal achieved — flowers that last.”

For more flower care advice, visit aboutflowers.com.

How do you keep your flowers fresh? We have all heard the folklore as well as my Grandma’s resolute instructions: a little bleach, gynecologist
see a touch of vinegar, a splash of vodka. Add some sugar or 7-UP, aspirin, vitamin C, Listerine, and pennies, too. What works, what doesn’t, will it make a difference and will it harm my flowers?

Many home remedies have a thread of truth as their basis. Bleach, vinegar, vodka, hydrogen peroxide and Listerine are antibacterial agents. They work to keep the water clear and clean to allow the flowers to drink and rehydrate fully without clogging from bacteria. Sugar, 7-UP and Listerine have sugars that “feed” the flower as it drinks the water mixture. Lemon juice, vitamin C and aspirin are wetting agents (acidifiers). They lower the ph of the water so the flower will drink more rapidly.

What about the use of pennies? Now that is an interesting remedy. Copper is an antibacterial agent, and when pennies were made of real copper, they would release enough copper into the vase water to have an effect. But modern pennies, which are not made of copper, will have no effect other than making your vase of flowers a few cents more valuable.

While home remedies can work, they also can harm your flowers if applied improperly.

Thank goodness for professional flower food. No conjecture and no concerns. With proper treatment, many flowers can easily last a week or more. Even my Grandma would be impressed.

Flower foods include an antibacterial, a sugar and a wetting agent. All three together in the proper proportion and ready to mix with water. Follow the recipe on the container, and you can extend the life of your flowers by days. Some varieties react so favorably to proper flower food that they will live twice as long as they would with pure water.

With the use of professional flower food, roses will bloom more fully. Gerberas will stand tall without the dreaded “bent neck.” Carnations will last for weeks, and peonies will bloom full and lush.

One of my friends who is a flower care expert says it best: “Embrace the handling techniques grounded in scientific research and proven facts. The goal achieved — flowers that last.”

For more flower care advice, visit aboutflowers.com.

Halloween is one of our favorite holidays here at FSN… mostly because we love to dress up! This year, sale
as usual, sovaldi
many of us went ALL OUT on our costumes. We had zombies, angels, witches, warriors, musicians, and a whole lot of other costumers you would not expect! Continue reading

Website currently taking orders however we encourage you to call us at 800-636-1336 to confirm order can be filled so we can ensure prompt delivery. Thank You. The Village Greenery Florist Dismiss